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In this post: Learn how to make your own disinfectant spray with our DIY “Lysol” recipe! Keep the ingredients on hand for when you can’t pick some up a the store!


*Please note: this cleaner has not been lab-tested. Use good judgment and always practice good hand-washing and house cleaning hygiene. 

Are you used to using Lysol to clean your home? Can’t find any at the store? Read on to learn how to make your own disinfectant spray or DIY “Lysol” recipe and let me know how you like it!

disinfectant cleaner bottle

Top 5 Household Disinfectants

Of course, you can use store-bought disinfectants to clean and disinfect hard surfaces. But if you can’t find any, here are some guidelines for the ingredients you need when making your own.

Bleach

Solutions made of regular ol’ bleach can be used to disinfect, if appropriate for the surface.

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for using bleach and make sure you’re in a space with proper ventilation.

Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser!

To make a DIY bleach cleaner, mix:

  • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water
    OR
  • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Leave DIY bleach mixture on the surface for at least 1 minute.

Alcohol

Any DIY cleaners or disinfectants need to contain at least 70% alcohol. (Conversely, hand sanitizer needs to contain at minimum 60% alcohol.)

See below for making reusable disinfectant wipes. 

Where to Find Alcohol

I know that a lot of places have recently been sold out of rubbing alcohol, so even making your own disinfectant wipes can be tricky. 

Here are some suggestions of places to look for alcohol:

  • your local grocery store
  • the drugstore/pharmacies
  • your corner store
  • online places like amazon (they have been working to reduce price gouging and to increase stock of essential items)
  • ULINE
  • office supply stores, like Staples
  • Walmart
  • Target
  • hardware stores
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FREE Printable

Cleaner Labels!

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide of 3% or higher can also be used as a disinfectant cleaner for most surfaces. Choose food-grade hydrogen peroxide for surfaces like cutting boards and even kitchen counters.

Vinegar

Vinegar is a great disinfectant for many surfaces including bathrooms, kitchens, and even fruits and veggies. The only downside really is the smell.

TIP: Avoid using vinegar on granite, marble, stone floors or surfaces, hardwood floors, and iron. The acid in the vinegar can break down the natural stone, wood, and iron. [source]

Vodka

Vodka at 140-proof or higher can be used as a disinfectant as well. Vodka is a natural deodorizer as well so it’s great on fabrics. It is flammable though – so be careful.

CDC Recommendations

According to the CDC (March 2020), you want to use an alcohol that is at least 70% alcohol to disinfect surfaces.

The alcohol can either be ethanol (the alcohol you drink) or isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol).

Why Use Essential Oils?

Some essential oils are said to have antiviral properties, along with antibacterial and antifungal properties.

An article in the American Journal of Essential Oils and Natural Products suggests that some essential oils may help fight flu viruses, though more research is necessary [source1,  source2].

However, I’m including a list of possible antiviral/antibacterial/antifungal essential oils here, in case you’d like to add them to your wipes for their scent or potential anti-germ properties: 

  • bergamot oil
  • eucalyptus oil
  • red thyme
  • cinnamon leaf
  • lemon
  • rosemary
  • peppermint
  • tea tree

How to Make Your Own Disinfectant Spray (a.k.a. Lysol Spray)

*Please note: this cleaner has not been lab-tested. Use good judgment and always practice good hand-washing and house cleaning hygiene. 

Ingredients

Materials

Instructions

1. Start by adding the eight ounces of alcohol to a spray bottle container of your choice.

2. Now all you have to do is add in the drops of all the essential oils!

3. Close your container tightly and shake well until everything is mixed together.

How to Use the Make Your Own Disinfectant Spray

  1. Clean the surface first, if it’s visually dirty.
  2. Shake the bottle.
  3. Spray and let it sit for several minutes to air dry. 

*Always test on an inconspicuous surface for colorfastness!

What to Use Disinfectant Cleaner On

This make-your-own disinfectant cleaner comes in especially handy during cold and flu season.

Use it to wipe down hard surfaces like:

  • stair railings
  • door knobs
  • light switches (spray on a cloth first, not directly on switch)
  • faucets
  • taps
  • sink
  • bathtubs
  • toilets

You could also spray it onto soft surfaces like couches, chairs, rugs, and curtains. 

disinfectant cleaner bottle

A Note From Shannon

Hi all!

Okay, so here’s the thing. I’m not a scientist or a doctor. I’m just a wife and mom. My heart is to provide what little help I can.

This “Lysol” recipe was created years ago, before everything that’s recently happened with Cov!d. I’ve updated the “recipe” with the latest info. 

Does that mean it will kill everything? Not necessarily.

But it can help if you don’t have or can’t get the store-bought disinfecting spray.

I know we are all confused and stressed and doing the best we each can. Please use common sense and use what resources you have well. If that means you increase the alcohol to make yourself more comfortable, by all means, do that.

Regular soap and warm water is said to destroy the current bug, so that could work too.

I really don’t have all the answers. But I hope the projects and things I have created here help you.

xo, Shannon

Looking for Disinfecting WIPES?

Want another way to easily disinfect your home?

Find my recipe for homemade Lysol and Clorox wipes here.

They’re easy to make and super convenient to use around your home as well as portable (if you put them in a Ziploc) to take with you to disinfect shopping carts, restaurant tables, and more.

disinfectant cleaner bottle

More DIY Cleaner Recipes

Have you tried this make your own disinfectant spray yet? If so, what’s your favorite part? If not, what’s stopping you so far?

disinfectant cleaner bottle

Make Your Own Disinfectant Spray - Printable DIY "Lysol" Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Active Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $15 or less

Are you using Lysol to clean your home? Can't find it at the store? Read on to hear my new DIY "Lysol" recipe and let me know how you like it! 

Materials

  • 8 ounces alcohol
  • 5 drops lavender essential oil
  • 7 drops lemon essential oil
  • 7 drops tea tree essential oil
  • 7 drops rosemary essential oil

Instructions

  1. Start by adding the eight ounces of alcohol to a spray bottle container of your choice.
  2. Now all you have to do is add in the drops of all the essential oils! Make Your Own Disinfectant Spray - DIY Lysol Recipe
  3. Close your container tightly and shake well until everything is mixed together.

Notes

Spray and wipe off most surfaces. 

*Always test on an inconspicuous surface for color fastness!

*Please note: this cleaner has not been lab-tested. Use good judgement and always practice good hand-washing and house cleaning hygiene. 

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Pinterest

cleaner labels

FREE Printable

Cleaner Labels!

shannon pixie photo and signature

home made lovely book on table with get it now text button

4 Comments

  1. Hi Shannon,
    I love the labels you made for the Lysol bottle.
    Can I download this somewhere from your site please?
    Thank you,
    vw

  2. I am wondering if you use distilled water for your lysol cleaner or for any of your cleaning products that use water? If not why not as I have always been given to understand that we should.
    Thanks for the time you spend making our lives easier!!
    Yvonne

    1. Hi Yvonne,

      You could definitely use distilled water, if you’d like! The reasons for using distilled vs tap water would depend on your local tap water. If your tap water has a lot of minerals in it (i.e. if you have hard water), it could leave “water marks”, which would of course be annoying when you’re trying to clean! Does that make sense?

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